BATHROOM Q&A WITH ERIN

It's bathroom week at the River Shack and we thought we better get the one and only Erin in to answer all your burning bathroom reno questions. Thanks to everyone who sent them in via social media x

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Q. WHAT DO YOU RECOMMEND (COLOUR, TILE SIZE ETC) TO MAKE A ROOM LOOK BIGGER?

We find using the same light coloured marble-look tile on three walls plus floor makes a smaller space look much bigger. You can then afford to use a smaller feature tile on one wall in the same tones if you want to add a bit of bling to the space!

BUT in saying that…. The River Shack is a holiday space and we really threw the rule book out the window for this one. We used black in a small space! Definitely not what we recommend if wanting a space to feel bigger ;). 

Another hot tip is you can use a large tile which can help make a space look bigger as well.

And finally don't over-style the space, keep it clutter free. 

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Q. I REALLY WANT A FLOATING SINK LIKE THE ONE YOU GUYS DID BUT MY WALL ARE PLASTERBOARD AND IT WOULD BE ON IN AN INSIDE WALL. IS IT STILL POSSIBLE AND HOW CAN IT BE SECURED?

Without seeing the space, we definitely recommend getting your builder to find the studs in your wall where you want the floating sink to be secured to. Your stone mason can then see where the builder has marked out the studs and secure to that area. 

It is definitely a job for a professional, not a DIY, as the stone is so heavy, you want to have the right supports in place. 

In an ideal world, you would have picked out the place you want your floating sink and have the builder add noggins in between the studs before you add your villaboard and waterproofing which would support the weight of the stone, the stone mason can then secure the sink to the noggin. 

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Q. HOW DO YOU KEEP TRADIES ON TRACK IN A BATHROOM RENO WHEN THERE ARE SO MANY MOVING PARTS? ANY TIPS TO MAKE IT RUN SMOOTHLY?

My biggest advice is to ensure you have really clear expectations on times…. Whether your timeline is 2 weeks for 6 weeks ensure you have made your timeline clear to every trade you are working with from the get-go, don’t leave anything open ended. If they know what you want from the start, your expectations will be reached.

Also don’t assume anything e.g that the tiler does the grouting the same day after he finishes laying tiles. Ask questions at the very beginning when you are getting quotes so that nothing is missed and you understand the process. 

Communication is key as with anything in renovating, keep all your trades informed so they know exactly when to come and when things get delayed. And make sure you hold them accountable! 

Another important point is to not make changes to a bathroom space once the project starts. Understand that it's on you, delays can impact the entire project as tradies often have several jobs running at once, if they miss the window they allocated to your project, it can often be weeks before they can come back to your project again. 

And lastly have all the fixtures and fittings that you are responsible for e.g taps, bath, tiles etc on site before the bathroom starts so all trades can see exactly what they are working with and there are no hold ups with delayed shipping or incorrect product. 

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Q. WE'RE BATHING OUR TWO YOUNG CHILDREN IN OUR ENSUITE FOR CONVENIENCE IN THESE EARLY DAYS. ENSUITE ONLY HAS ONE TOWEL RAIL. IDEAS FOR WHERE TO PURCHASE AN ON TREND STAND OR ANOTHER OPTION? NOT WANTING TO INSTALL ANYTHING PERMANENT TO THE TILES THAT WE WON'T REQUIRE LATER ON. 

A great idea is a decorative timber ladder which leans on the wall, it's not permanent and after you have finished with it in your bathroom you can even hang throws over it. You can usually find them at Freedom or online at Zanui.

Another option is decorative hooks, Bon likes to use them in bedrooms as a feature - I often wonder what in the world they are for, but Bon assures me they are a styling feature… After you finish having to use them for towels for the kids, they still look beautiful.

Q. COULDN'T BE MORE BURNING... TILER ON STANDBY... DO I TILE A VANITY ALCOVE FLOOR THE SAME AS BATHROOM AND TOILET OR DO I LAY FLOORBOARDS BECAUSE THE ALCOVE RUNS OFF A CORRIDOR THAT IS GOING TO BE TIMBERED. I.E THERE IS NO SEPARATING DOOR BETWEEN. HOPE YOU UNDERSTAND WHAT I MEAN...

Pretty sure I understand and can picture it - in our experience we have always been recommended to have a water resistant product near a wet area. I would be inclined to say tile it but I would need to see the space… Bonnie might try and change your mind though and pick something more beautiful where I always go for practical. You need to decide what suits your living arrangements.

I would always go on the side of safety and have a floor that is suitable for a wet space in the whole area. 

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DID YOU MISS THIS WEEK'S EP? CATCH UP BELOW...

 
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Want to get your hands on all the goodies we have picked for the bathroom? Shop the entire River Shack Reno by clicking the button below.